Microsoft Encourages Students to Become Engineers

Amanda Stoneman — December 9th, 2015
Microsoft Encourages Students to Become Engineers

Microsoft has announced plans to invest a significant amount of money in public school computer science programs to encourage high school students to pursue careers in computer science. The aim of these efforts is to combat the shortage of graduates in the field while building a more diverse talent pool.

American tech companies are noticing a shortage of new engineers because public school computer science programs are expensive to maintain. Fortunately, Microsoft has announced plans to invest $75 million in these courses over the next few years to help support a new generation of talented engineers.

Satya Nadella, CEO of Microsoft, says the investment is a way to encourage more students to pursue careers in computer science. Microsoft plans to donate money and resources to various nonprofit organizations that support these programs around the world.

In addition, Microsoft intends to expand its Technology Education and Literacy in Schools (TEALS) program, which pairs engineers with teachers in high school to ensure students are getting the highest quality education in engineering and computer science. In a decade, Microsoft hopes to have TEALS in close to 5,000 schools.

This donation marks a significant growth for Microsoft’s YouthSpark program, an effort to get more students interested in computer science and build a more diverse selection of talent for the technology industry. The program aims to combat the shortage of computer science graduates while increasing the population of women and minorities in the field.

Google and Facebook are also contributing money and resources to help kids develop essential skills for success in the high-paying tech industry. New York, Chicago and San Francisco have made pledges to ensure all public schools are teaching computer science and making it a high school graduation requirement.

Hopefully the new priority on computer science will create opportunities for high school students from diverse backgrounds to fill positions in one of the most lucrative industries